Hydrgnc

Without prejudice.

Oct 29 2013
“'That's right,' I said, and bit the bullet. We were having the Conversation. 'You were named after a drag queen in a Lou Reed song.' She grinned like a light going on. 'Oh Dad. I do love you,' she said. Then she wrote what I'd said down on the back of an envelope, in case she forgot it. I'm not sure that I'd ever expected the Conversation to go quite like that.” Neil Gaiman on Lou Reed: ‘His songs were the soundtrack to my life’ | Music | The Guardian

Oct 26 2013
“A grown man whose entire approach to politics boils down to “If I were in charge…” is not the messiah, and he’s not a particularly naughty boy either. He is the Jeremy Clarkson of the left: a narcissist who is smart enough to realise that he can draw an audience by playing the radical populist.” Russell Brand: The Jeremy Clarkson of the left » Spectator Blogs

Oct 24 2013
“Not long ago, I was at a party myself. It was getting late and for some reason I found myself not talking to anyone for a little while; just slumped into a chair, and listening. Whatever playlist the host had in mind at the start of the evening was long out of the window, and by now people were just picking tunes at whim from a web-based streaming service. It struck me how many of the songs that came on featured sirens of one sort of another… I started to wonder what it meant to be be so beset by alarms: what could be the psychic consequences of such a permanent state of sonic panic?” The Quietus | Features | Song To The Siren: Pop Culture & The Warning Klaxon

Oct 19 2013

Beautiful colours, genius song.



“It is an interesting time for the relaunch of local television because in the digital era, mainstream television has lost its connection with place - witness the demise of the ITV regions, which were defined by the reach of the analogue transmitters. The lesson from history seems to be that when local TV is very local, such as in the case of Milton Keynes Channel 40 or Waddington Village Television, it can be surprisingly addictive, and viewers may prefer watching programmes about their own community to glossier alternatives, because there is novelty and interest in seeing their own High Street or the local school’s Christmas play on screen. But when small stations with low advertising revenue attempt merely to mimic mainstream programmes, which can draw on lavish central budgets and high production values, viewers usually prefer to watch the main channels.”

BBC News - The bizarre world of 1970s hyper-local TV

- also worth a look purely for the hilarious/excruciating poetry reading at the end of the video that accompanies the article (click through to see it).


Aug 18 2013
“The drinking culture has changed immensely over the years. The youngsters have that much else to enjoy themselves with, or use their spare time. They don’t need to go in pubs. In our day, we used to be taken to the pub by our fathers when we were 18, and he would buy us our first pint, or what he thought was our first pint. It was a part of our everyday life. The pub trade is struggling now, because the youngsters will go out once or twice at the weekend and they’ll spend a fair amount of money, but during the week they don’t seem to go out.” BBC News - The places where the pubs are boarded up

Jul 25 2013
(via Bob Mazzer On The Tube | Spitalfields Life)
Wonderful pictures taken on the tube in the 1980s. This is the dirty, decrepit, under-funded London that I fell in love with on frequent visits at the start of that decade, to which I eventually relocated in 1986.

(via Bob Mazzer On The Tube | Spitalfields Life)

Wonderful pictures taken on the tube in the 1980s. This is the dirty, decrepit, under-funded London that I fell in love with on frequent visits at the start of that decade, to which I eventually relocated in 1986.


Jul 15 2013
“In Scandinavian countries the lion’s share of the revenue IS Spotify, IS streaming. There’s nowhere to buy a CD. Is that Spotify’s fault? Did Spotify kill the CD, the album and the record shop? No, the public did, by embracing new technology, and now they’ve all gone to streaming and the crybaby acts keep lamenting the passage of the past the same way buggy whip makers and typewriter constructors did and died.” Lefsetz Letter » Blog Archive » Thom Yorke vs. Spotify

“… there was a chink in the crimson armour in 1961 — a sole interloper emerged as an experiment. The radical change? No paint at all. Naked. Shorn of its coating. Starkers in fact! Has the permissive society of the 1960s finally lost its mind?” London’s Experiment with a Naked Routemaster